Lafayette – Events

LECTURE: Dr. Stanley Hauerwas, Will D. Campbell Lecture on Faith and Social Justice

Date of Event: November 27, 2006

Location: University of Mississippi

Dr. Stanley Hauerwas, Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke’s School of Divinity, was the inaugural speaker for the Will D. Campbell Lecture Series on Faith and Social Justice at the University of Mississippi. Hauerwas’ work draws on a great range of literatures from classical, philosophical, and theological texts to contemporary political theory. He also works in medical ethics, issues of war and peace, and the care of the mentally handicapped.

These videos include the Q&A session following his talk which took place on November 27, 2006, at the University of Mississippi. The event was co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, the First Presbyterian Church, the Reformed University Fellowship, and St. Peter’s Episcopal Church.

For more information on Dr. Hauerwas’s talk, see this press release and the Winter Institute’s January 2007 Wellspring newsletter.

The Q&A Session with Dr. Hauerwas:

UM Lectures – Stanley Hauerwas Lecture 12 from Winter Institute on Vimeo.

LECTURE: Rev. James Lawson, The International Conference on Race keynote address

Date of Event: October 31, 2003

Location: University of Mississippi

Rev. James Lawson was an important activist in the early days of the Civil Rights movement and was a leader in teaching and practicing nonviolence. He studied nonviolence in India before returning to the United States to study theology. Rev. Lawson was active in the Fellowship of Reconciliation (FOR) and the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). He has also advocated for immigrant rights and a living wage and has opposed the war in Iraq.

Rev. Lawson delivered the keynote address for “The International Conference on Race: Racial Reconciliation,” sponsored by the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation. The conference took place at the University of Mississippi on 10/31/03.

More information on the conference can be found here.

 

Rev. Lawson’s speech:

The full event can also be viewed here.

LECTURE: Open Doors: Forty Years of Opportunity

Date of Event: October 01, 2002

Location: University of Mississippi

Open Doors recognized the 40th anniversary of Dr. James Meredith entering the University of Mississippi. Dr. Meredith’s admittance marked the end of segregation for the University of Mississippi. According to the University website, “The 2002-2003 academic year is dedicated to the courage of Dr. James H. Meredith ’63, and to all The University of Mississippi students, faculty, alumni, and staff who have stood up for open doors and opportunity for all on this campus.” Throughout the year, several events took place, including a night ceremony and the First International Conference on Race, hosted by the Winter Institute in October 2003.

The Open Doors Night Ceremony begins with a ceremonial walk through the Lyceum. Mrs. Myrlie Evers-Williams, introduced by Governor William Winter, speaks to the audience of the significance of Dr. Meredith’s bravery as well as the importance of being bold and remembering the past.

More information can be found here.

Open Doors Night Ceremony:

The full event can also be viewed here.

LECTURE: Dr. John Hope Franklin, President Clinton’s Initiative on Race

Date of Event: March 11, 1998

Location: University of Mississippi

Dr. John Hope Franklin served as chairman for the advisory board of Bill Clinton’s One America: The President’s Initiative on Race in 1998. He is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History, and for seven years was Professor of Legal History in the Law School at Duke University. He is a native of Oklahoma and a graduate of Fisk University. He received the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in history from Harvard University. He has taught at a number of institutions, including Fisk University, St. Augustine’s College, North Carolina Central University, Howard University, Brooklyn College, and the University of Chicago.

Dr. Franklin’s speech preceded the Initiative on Race event in Oxford, MS, that occurred March 16-17, 1998. In his speech, he discusses his work with the Initiative on Race and his experiences across the country working on the Initiative.

More information about the Initiative on Race at the University of Mississippi can be found here, and general information on Clinton’s Initiative on Race here.

Dr. Franklin’s lecture:

The full lecture can also be viewed here.

LECTURE: Dr. John Hope Franklin, 2007 Civil Rights Education Summit keynote address

Date of Event: June 27, 2007

Location: University of Mississippi

Dr. John Hope Franklin served as chairman for the advisory board of Bill Clinton’s One America: The President’s Initiative on Race in 1998. He is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History, and for seven years was Professor of Legal History in the Law School at Duke University. He is a native of Oklahoma and a graduate of Fisk University. He received the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in history from Harvard University. He has taught at a number of institutions, including Fisk University, St. Augustine’s College, North Carolina Central University, Howard University, Brooklyn College, and the University of Chicago.

Dr. Franklin spoke at the 3rd annual Civil Rights Education Summit in Oxford, Mississippi. He speaks on the topics of slavery, racism, and segregation and tells several stories about his own experiences. He describes how racism began in the United States and how it continues to impact people today.  More information about the Summit can be found here.

Dr. Franklin’s lecture:

Dr. Franklin’s lecture can also be viewed here.

LECTURE: Rita Bender, “The Legacy of Slavery” and awards to C.C. Bryant & the Philadelphia Coalition

Date of Event: October 25, 2005

Location: University of Mississippi Rita Bender is currently a lawyer in Seattle, Washington.

She has been an active participant in civil rights and justice advocacy since the early 1960’s. She served as a civil rights field worker for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) in Meridian, MS, and therafter worked with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party prior to attending law school at Rutgers University. Mrs. Bender was a visiting faculty member at the University of Mississippi for the 2009-2010 academic year in order to teach a course on restorative justice, and she has presented papers and lectured at numerous universities over the years on restorative justice as well. “The Legacy of Slavery” was presented at the University of Mississippi on 10/25/05.

The full text of the lecture can be found here.

After the lecture, there is a screening of a short documentary on C.C. Bryant by his granddaughter, Judith Barlow, and the presentation of awards to C.C. Bryant and to the Philadelphia Coalition.

Mrs. Bender’s lecture: 

Mrs. Bender’s lecture can also be viewed here.

School Desegregation in Lafayette County

From the 1950s through the 1970s, many things changed for African-Americans on both the national and local level. In Oxford, organizations such as the Oxford Improvement Association, the Oxford Development Association, and the North Mississippi Rural Legal Services were founded. Schools were integrated resulting in the combined schools such as Bramlett Elementary, Oxford Junior High School, and Oxford High School.

With the entry of James Meredith into the University of Mississippi in 1962, many things changed. Local African-Americans had a mixed reaction to the changes in the traditional white-black relationships. Other African-Americans participated actively in the 1960s Civil Rights activities including housing northern Civil Rights workers in their homes, participating in Civil Rights marches, praising the work of Martin Luther King, Jr., and helping organize new improvement programs for their communities.

Sources:

“We Cannot Walk Alone Exhibition” Olemiss.edu. 15 November 2006
<http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/general_library/files/archives/exhibits/civilrights/aa/burns.html>

Nelms, Chuck. “Thoughts and Recollections of Ole Miss Fall of 1962.” Feb 4 1991. Jun 2006 <http://www.llf.lib.ms.us/winnebago/LLF/Oral%20Histories/NELMS2.htm>

“Integrating Ole Miss.” Integrating Ole Miss: A Civil Rights Milestone. June 2002. John F. Kennedy Library. Jun 2006 <http://www.jfklibrary.org/meredith/home.html>

Sobotka, C. John Jr. A History of Lafayette County, Mississippi. Oxford, MS: Rebel Press, 1976.

Protest for Black Studies Curriculum

(2/25/1970) Eighty students and a black professor demonstrated for the establishment of a Black Studies program on February 25, 1970. After their attempt the students were arrested and taken to the Lafayette County Jail.

Sources:

“We Cannot Walk Alone Exhibition” Olemiss.edu. 15 November 2006
<http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/general_library/files/archives/exhibits/civilrights/aa/burns.html>

Nelms, Chuck. “Thoughts and Recollections of Ole Miss Fall of 1962.” Feb 4 1991. Jun 2006 <http://www.llf.lib.ms.us/winnebago/LLF/Oral%20Histories/NELMS2.htm>

“Integrating Ole Miss.” Integrating Ole Miss: A Civil Rights Milestone. June 2002. John F. Kennedy Library. Jun 2006 <http://www.jfklibrary.org/meredith/home.html>

Sobotka, C. John Jr. A History of Lafayette County, Mississippi. Oxford, MS: Rebel Press, 1976.

Integration of Ole Miss

(September 30-October 1, 1962) Lafayette County is the home of the University of Mississippi in Oxford. With buzz growing around the campus of Ole Miss possibly integrating in 1962, a national spotlight was turned on the campus. James Meredith, the first black student to attend Ole Miss, enrolled required federal protection and escort. Meredith was opposed by many, including Governor Ross Barnett and Lieutenant Governor Paul B. Johnson. Lt. Gov. Johnson briefly stood in the doorway of the Lyceum to block Meredith’s enrollment, though privately he and Governor Barnett negotiated with Attorney General Robert Kennedy on the nature of the federal protection for Meredith.

On the afternoon of September 30, 1962, U.S Justice Department officials along with federal marshals began to take their positions upon arrival on the campus of Ole Miss.

On that same afternoon the U.S. Marshals began to line up along the front of the administration building known as the Lyceum in anticipation of a crowd of hecklers.

Chief U.S. Marshal McShane was ordered to bring in the rest of the marshals from the airport and to secure the perimeter of Baxter Hall, located several buildings away from the Lyceum. Later that evening, a convoy transporting James Meredith from the airport arrived onto campus and stopped at Baxter Hall where they waited for more protection as crowds began to grow at the Lyceum. Baxter Hall would also be the dorm in which James Meredith would stay during his time at Ole Miss.

After forming in front of the Lyceum, rioters began to throw objects at federal forces. In return, tear gas was deployed onto the crowd by U.S. Marshals. The National Guard was deployed to assist at the Lyceum, arriving a few hours after midnight on September 31. Within minutes the Lyceum turned into a terror zone with bullets bouncing off the Lyceum columns and property catching fire.

During the riots, Ray Gunter, an Oxford resident, was sitting around the construction site of Shoemaker Hall with a friend when the crowd of rioters came toward them. When the two began to flee the site, Gunter was shot to death in the head in front of Shoemaker Hall. French journalist Paul Guihard was also killed during the riots.

On October 1, 1962 James Meredith was escorted by U.S. Justice Department Attorney John Doar and marshals to the Lyceum to register for admission. James Meredith attended his first class, American History, at Bondurant Hall under heavy protection by federal forces.

James Meredith graduated from the university in August of 1963, becoming the first African-American to graduate from the University of Mississippi.

Sources:

“We Cannot Walk Alone Exhibition” Olemiss.edu. 15 November 2006
<http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/general_library/files/archives/exhibits/civilrights/aa/burns.html>

Nelms, Chuck. “Thoughts and Recollections of Ole Miss Fall of 1962.” Feb 4 1991. Jun 2006 <http://www.llf.lib.ms.us/winnebago/LLF/Oral%20Histories/NELMS2.htm>

“Integrating Ole Miss.” Integrating Ole Miss: A Civil Rights Milestone. June 2002. John F. Kennedy Library. Jun 2006 <http://www.jfklibrary.org/meredith/home.html>

Sobotka, C. John Jr. A History of Lafayette County, Mississippi. Oxford, MS: Rebel Press, 1976.