Madison – People/Persons

Magee, Sylvester

Sylvester Magee (May 29, 1841 – October 15, 1971), is believed to be the last surviving American slave. However, as there are no birth records, his actual date of birth cannot be proven. The oldest person ever on record lived to be 122, but if Magee was actually born in 1841, he would claim that title. Magee was born in slavery in North Carolina and was sold at the age of 19 in Enterprise, Mississippi, to work in Covington County. He escaped slavery and served in the Union Army during the Civil War. Some records show he might have served in the Confederate Army for a time as well. After the war, he returned to Mississippi. He died in 1971 in Columbia, MS. He is currently buried in an unmarked grave near Foxworth, MS.

Sources:
Leggett, Karrie. “Foxworth Residents Claim Resting Place of Last American Slave Discovered.” WDAM. 28 Nov. 2011. Web. <http://www.wdam.com/story/16136479/foxworth-residents-claim-resting-place-of-last-american-slave-discovered>.

Sylvester Magee.” Wikipedia. Web28 Nov. 2011. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sylvester_Magee>.

Rimmer, U.S.

U.S. Rimmer was the first Black elected to a judgeship in Beat 5, Madison County.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Bowman, Sister Thea

Sister Thea Bowman (1937-1990) was born in Canton. She was a nationally and internationally known evangelist, teacher, gospel singer, writer, lecturer and advocate for justice and peace. She was the first African American woman to receive a Doctorate in Theology from Boston College. Sister Thea, a Francisan Sister of Perpetual Adoration, was the daughter of Dr. & Mrs. Theon Bowman of Canton and grew up in the community.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Carmichael, Dr. George

Dr. Carmichael was a native of Canton. He practiced medicine in Canton for 50 years. Upon graduating from Meharry Medical School in Nashville, Carmichael returned to Canton to practice in 1934. If he had to hospitalize his patients, he had to send them to Yazoo City to a black hospital. Dr. Carmichael continuously applied to the board of directors to be on staff at the King Daughters Hospital in Canton, but was repeatedly turned down. The last time he applied, he was accepted but with one stipulation: he could enter through the front door but his patients had to enter through the rear doors. Dr. Carmichael thanked the hospital staff for accepting him but he declined their offer. Dr. Carmichael continued to send his patients 30 miles to Yazoo County.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Chinn, C.O.

Chinn was born September 18, 1919 in Madison County. He is said to be “the last of the great frontiersmen”for his work and dedication to civil rights. Chinn is thought of as the “father”of the civil rights in Madison County. He was one of the organizers for the Madison County CORE chapter, and headed many Civil Rights marches, rallies, and meetings in the county. Chinn was responsible for helping desegregate public places in the county and for making racial equality mandatory across the county. Chinn paid for his involvement in the movement by losing nearly all of his property and serving a term on the chain gang, but he never stopped agitating. In recognition of his contributions to the Civil Rights movement, Canton declared May 2, 1999 as C.O. Chinn Day.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Coney, Eddie E.

Coney was born January 8, 1923 in Magnolia, MS, and was a civil and human rights activist. After completing his education at Alcorn State University, he and his wife Clarece Dillon Coney managed the Flora Parish State 4-H Club Camp from 1952 to 1965. They then moved to Canton. During the 1966 Freedom Summer tear gas incident at McNeal Elementary School, Coney stood on his front porch with a rifle, ready to protect his family and his dwelling. Marchers running to the Coney home for shelter literally picked him up and brought him into his house away from the gas. During that same event, Coney housed and fed 127 civil rights marchers during the summer of 1966.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

 

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

 

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

 

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

 

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

 

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

 

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

 

Coney, Clarice Dillon

The wife of Eddie Coney, Clarice Coney is a retired educator. Mrs. Coney was a civil rights activist in Madison County where she assisted in voter education and registration. She was a member of CORE, COFO, and the NAACP.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Devine, Annie

Annie Devine was one of Madison County’s leading women in civil rights. She and other civil rights leaders organized the Canton office for CORE in 1963. In 1964, Devine and other civil rights workers organized Canton’s first Freedom Day on February 28. Through arrests, fire hoses, attack dogs, and tear gas, Devine and the movement prevailed, making Madison County a better place.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Lindsey, Solomon

Solomon was born on September 1, 1878 in Canton. He received vocational training at Tuskegee, Alabama, and Piney Woods Country Life School. Solomon eventually became the owner of a 700-acre farm. Sixteen families- comprised of 120 men, women, and children- lived on his farm.

In 1924, Solomon founded the Madison County Training School and served as superintendent. His efforts also made possible the operation of the G.I. school for men in Canton, also known as the Commercial College. With the assistance of Reverend C.H. Prophet, Solomon organized the C.H.B.A. in Canton, an association offering insurance for sickness and burial expenses. In addition, he owned and operated a funeral home.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

Holbert, Joe

Holbert was the first African American to deliver mail in rural Madison County. Holbert normally delivered mail twice a week on horseback. The photo was taken in the late 1880s.

Sources:

Brown-Wright, Flonzie. Looking Back to Move Ahead Germantown, OH: FBW, 1994.

Cheeks-Collins, Jennifer E. Black America Series: Madison County, Mississippi Charleston: Arcadia, 2002.

Townsend Davis, Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement New York: W.W. Norton, 1998.

Dittmer, John. Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994.

Mead, Carol Lynn. The Land Between Two Rivers: Madison County, Mississippi. Canton, MS: Friends of the Madison County—Canton Public Library, 1987.

Orr-Klopfer, M. Susan. Where Rebels Roost : Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited. (self-published) 2005.

Payne, Charles M. I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.