Tippah

Tippah County Data Dashboard

W3.CSS

Antioch Missionary Baptist Church

The Antioch Missionary Baptist Church outside Blue Mountain was burned on October 30, 1964, a few hours after a rally and voter registration drive for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party’s “Freedom Vote”at which delegate Fannie Lou Hamer spoke. Civil rights workers planned to use the church as a polling place before it was burned. Worker Cleveland Sellers noted that the burning was a “deliberate response to successful campaigning in the area.”A group of students and professors from Oberlin College assisted church members in rebuilding the church in late December of 1964, working with the Council of Federated Organizations. Civil rights leader Annie Devine spoke at a rally of 200 in the rebuilt church on December 31, 1964. The church is located on County Road 700.

Sources:

Associated Press. “Another Negro Church Burns.”Hattiesburg American. 31 October 1964.
McKee, Don. “Oberlin College Crowd at Ripley.” Associated Press, 22 December 1964.

Veazey, Walter K. “Hundreds of Miles From Home OC Students Keep Yule Promise.”The
Chronicle-Telegram, 26 December 1964.

Freedom Vote

(1964) Tippah County participated in the November 1964 “Freedom Vote”when state democratic party leaders refused to consider the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party’s inclusion in the regular election. Approximately seventy-five Tippah residents worked on the campaign.

Sources:

Associated Press. “Another Negro Church Burns.”Hattiesburg American. 31 October 1964.

Files of the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission.
www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents/er/sovcom/

McKee, Don. “Oberlin College Crowd at Ripley.” Associated Press, 22 December 1964.

“The Shootings at Kent State University: Thirty Years Later.” The Journal of Blacks in
Higher Education. 2000.

Veazey, Walter K. “Hundreds of Miles From Home OC Students Keep Yule Promise.”The
Chronicle-Telegram, 26 December 1964.

Foster, Hazel

Hazel Foster ran a beauty shop and the Foster Funeral Home in Ripley and was a member of the NAACP. She applied for notary public status but was denied on the grounds that “she is far above average in inteligence (sic) and of the sort that can be a real problem in our society.” Foster was on the board of directors of Zinj Enterprises, a general merchandise store in Holly Springs.

Sources:

Associated Press. “Another Negro Church Burns.”Hattiesburg American. 31 October 1964.

Files of the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission.
www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents/er/sovcom/

McKee, Don. “Oberlin College Crowd at Ripley.” Associated Press, 22 December 1964.

“The Shootings at Kent State University: Thirty Years Later.” The Journal of Blacks in
Higher Education. 2000.

Veazey, Walter K. “Hundreds of Miles From Home OC Students Keep Yule Promise.”The
Chronicle-Telegram, 26 December 1964.

Gibbs, Phillip Lafayette

Phillip Lafayette Gibbs, born in Ripley, Tippah County, MS in 1948, was killed by police during a riot at Jackson State University, where he was studying law, in May 1970. The riot occurred after several days of protests by Jackson State students in response to the shooting of four Kent State antiwar protesters. When 100 students congregated around the Alexander Center Dormitory, police fired into the crowd, killing Gibbs and a high school student James Earl Green. A federal commission report later showed that the police response was unwarranted, with the officers confident that they would not be prosecuted for shooting at a crowd of young black people.

Sources:

Associated Press. “Another Negro Church Burns.”Hattiesburg American. 31 October 1964.

Files of the Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission.
www.mdah.state.ms.us/arlib/contents/er/sovcom/

McKee, Don. “Oberlin College Crowd at Ripley.” Associated Press, 22 December 1964.

“The Shootings at Kent State University: Thirty Years Later.” The Journal of Blacks in
Higher Education. 2000.

Veazey, Walter K. “Hundreds of Miles From Home OC Students Keep Yule Promise.”The
Chronicle-Telegram, 26 December 1964.