Events

Fire Destroys Freedom School

(9/17/1964) “A Negro church used recently as a voter registration school was destroyed by fire early today. Authorities confirmed that the St. John’s Baptist church near the rural community of Valley View went up in flames shortly after midnight. The […]

First Case Tried in Madison Co. Court

(June 1832) The rights of slaves in early Madison County were stringently limited by law. A slave named Pegg was the central figure in the first case tried in Madison County court. Pegg was charged with assault and battery with […]

Freedom House of Hattiesburg

In 1964, beginning with Freedom Day (January 22) and continuing through Freedom Summer, Mrs. Lenon E. Woods, the owner of the Woods Guest House at 507 and 509 Mobile Street, allowed the Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) to use a […]

Freedom Rides

Date of Event: May-November 1961 The Freedom Rides began in Washington DC on May 4, 1961, with thirteen Freedom Riders (7 black, 6 white) from CORE who aimed to travel by bus through the South in order to bring attention […]

Freedom Rides

In the summer of 1961, the Freedom Riders, a group of mostly young people, both black and white, risked their lives to challenge the system of segregation in interstate travel in the South. The purpose of the rides was “to […]

Freedom Summer and the Meredith March in Madison Co.

(6/23/1966) Freedom marchers tried to pitch tents to lodge women and children on the grounds of McNeal Elementary School during James Meredith’s March Against Fear. The marchers were not permitted to pitch the tents on the grounds, but they proceeded […]

Freedom Vote

(1964) Tippah County participated in the November 1964 “Freedom Vote”when state democratic party leaders refused to consider the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party’s inclusion in the regular election. Approximately seventy-five Tippah residents worked on the campaign. Sources: Associated Press. “Another Negro […]

Freedom Vote-Madison Co.

(1963) The Council of Federated Organizations (COFO) organized mock elections in 1963. The unofficial elections helped determine voting strength and showed that blacks would vote if given the opportunity. The mock election, called the “Freedom Vote”, was an overwhelming success. […]