School Desegregation in Lafayette County

From the 1950s through the 1970s, many things changed for African-Americans on both the national and local level. In Oxford, organizations such as the Oxford Improvement Association, the Oxford Development Association, and the North Mississippi Rural Legal Services were founded. Schools were integrated resulting in the combined schools such as Bramlett Elementary, Oxford Junior High School, and Oxford High School.

With the entry of James Meredith into the University of Mississippi in 1962, many things changed. Local African-Americans had a mixed reaction to the changes in the traditional white-black relationships. Other African-Americans participated actively in the 1960s Civil Rights activities including housing northern Civil Rights workers in their homes, participating in Civil Rights marches, praising the work of Martin Luther King, Jr., and helping organize new improvement programs for their communities.

Sources:

“We Cannot Walk Alone Exhibition” Olemiss.edu. 15 November 2006
<http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/general_library/files/archives/exhibits/civilrights/aa/burns.html>

Nelms, Chuck. “Thoughts and Recollections of Ole Miss Fall of 1962.” Feb 4 1991. Jun 2006 <http://www.llf.lib.ms.us/winnebago/LLF/Oral%20Histories/NELMS2.htm>

“Integrating Ole Miss.” Integrating Ole Miss: A Civil Rights Milestone. June 2002. John F. Kennedy Library. Jun 2006 <http://www.jfklibrary.org/meredith/home.html>

Sobotka, C. John Jr. A History of Lafayette County, Mississippi. Oxford, MS: Rebel Press, 1976.